Publisher Template for Affinity Publisher


Indie publishing for games can be an interesting trade.  A lot of indie developers - myself included - tend to wear many hats.  We are writers, editors, art directors, layout artists, I.T. and everything else in between.

We are also typically rather broke which means we have to be creative with what we use and what we do.  Some indies have the funds or find ways to afford expensive software like InDesign, while others choose the free options like Scribus.  Still, others forgo layout publishing and focus on simple trade dress that can be easily completed in a word processor.  In the middle of all these options sits Serif, a British software company that has been developing a load of creative and enterprise apps since longer than I care to remember.  A few years ago they decided to slowly start shelving their "Plus" series of products in favor of the Affinity series.

The latest in this crop is Affinity Publisher the successor to Page Plus series of the desktop development software and an affordable alternative to InDesign that sits in a comfortable category between InDesign's beefiness and Microsoft Publisher's user-friendly but limited frame.  As such it is a great pick up and grow application that can get very crunchy as the developer grows with it.

The one thing that it lacks is community support from the Indie developer scene.  In walks Venatus Vinco with his Affinity Publisher Basics, a simple template and how-to on the system for those who use it but feel rather abandoned by publisher suppliers like Fat Goblin Games and Wizards of the Coast who exclusively develop templates and the like for InDesign leaving those who cannot afford InDesign (or don't want to put up with Scribus's "it's not a bug it's a feature") in the cold to figure out from the bottom step how to use a different piece of software.

Vinco's Affinity Publisher Basics comes with a load of fonts, a few template images, the template itself and a Publisher Basics pdf.

The pdf comes with a lot of handy guides like paragraph styling guides, POD guides, image placement, etc.  It is a wonderful overview and starting guide to Affinity's systems.

For the $5.00 it costs I truly recommend this if for nothing else then a Getting started guide to Affinity's systems.




DrivethruRPG Open d6 Sub-Category - One Month Out

One month ago I somewhat succeed on my mission to get WestEnd Game's d6 system recognized as its own category on DrivethruRPG.  This post here explains my reasonings and this post explains the result (this way I am not rehashing words). 

TL;DR:  WEG's Open d6 is a robust system with a lot of excellent creators behind it that all too easily get lost in the giant melting pot that is "d6 systems".  This eventually causes a lack of sales and creators leaving the format because of those lacking sales.

So, where do we stand a month later with its own sub-category?

Not as well as I hoped honestly.  Outside of strong support from Battlefield Press and my own Genius Loci Games - as well as some one-offs by  AISP and Griffon Publishing - many creators have opted not to move their Open d6 products over to the sub-category.

This could be for a few reasons by my way of thinking:

  1. The line was not profitable so why waste the time.
  2. The publisher is out of business and no one really mans the digital fronts anymore.
  3. The e-mails I sent out to publishers were placed in spam folders or deleted under the idea that the e-mail was spam.
  4. The publisher has moved on to bigger and better things or has their own plans in the works for marketing and bringing renewed interest to the system.
Being that Open d6 is a system near and dear to my heart I will personally continue to look after the sub-category in hopes that other publishers - new and old - will start to support it and bring attention to the system.

Deviant Friday - Neytirix

This week's Deviant is Neytirix, and Aussie digital artist with a wonderful sense of color and cute whose work (even the dark stuff) ...